Anti-War Campaigners Have to Change Electoral Tactics

by on April 2, 2008 · 0 comments

in Civil Rights, Election, Organizing, Peace Movement

Neither Clinton nor Obama has a real plan to end the occupation of Iraq, but they could be forced to change position.

By Naomi Klein and Jeremy Scahill, The Guardian. Posted April 1, 2008.


So said Dick Cheney when asked last week about public opinion being overwhelming against the war in Iraq. “You can’t be blown off course by polls.” His attitude about the the fact that the number of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq has reached 4,000 displayed similar levels of sympathy. They “voluntarily put on the uniform,” the Vice-President told ABC news.

This brick wall of indifference helps explain the paradox in which we in the anti-war camp find ourselves five years into the occupation of Iraq: anti-war sentiment is as strong as ever, but our movement seems to be dwindling.

Sixty-four per cent of Americans tell pollsters they oppose the war, but you’d never know it from the thin turnout at recent anniversary rallies and vigils.

When asked why they aren’t expressing their anti-war opinions through the anti-war movement, many say they have simply lost faith in the power of protest. They marched against the war before it began, marched on the first, second and third anniversaries. And yet five years on, U.S. leaders are still shrugging: “So?” [For the rest of this article, go here.]

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