The End to SOPA? White House Opposes It and Congress Shelves It.

by on January 17, 2012 · 3 comments

in American Empire, Civil Rights, Media

Editor: This could be the end to the current version of SOPA, as the White House has announced that it opposes major portions of it and its companion bill. And leaders of Congress are promising to shelve it. Of course, after what happened with NDAA, progressives are warily keeping our eye on what actually goes down.

White House Says It Opposes Parts of Two Antipiracy Bills

By Edward Wyatt / New York Times / Originally pub. Jan 14, 2012

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration said Saturday that it strongly opposed central elements of two Congressional efforts to enforce copyrights on the Internet, all but killing the current versions of legislation that has divided both political parties and pitted Hollywood against Silicon Valley.

The comments by the administration’s chief technology officials, posted on a White House blog Saturday, came as growing opposition to the legislation had already led sponsors of the bills to reconsider a measure that would force Internet service providers to block access to Web sites that offer or link to copyrighted material.

“Let us be clear,” the White House statement said, “online piracy is a real problem that harms the American economy, threatens jobs for significant numbers of middle class workers and hurts some of our nation’s most creative and innovative companies and entrepreneurs.”

However, it added, “We will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.”

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Controversial online piracy bill shelved until ‘consensus’ is found

By Brendan Sasso / The Hill / Originally pub. Jan. 14, 2012

 House Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) said early Saturday morning that Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) promised him the House will not vote on the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) unless there is consensus on the bill.

 “While I remain concerned about Senate action on the Protect IP Act, I am confident that flawed legislation will not be taken up by this House,” Issa said in a statement. “Majority Leader Cantor has assured me that we will continue to work to address outstanding concerns and work to build consensus prior to any anti-piracy legislation coming before the House for a vote.”

 The announcement comes just hours after Judiciary Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas), SOPA’s sponsor, made a major concession to the bill’s critics by agreeing to drop a controversial provision that would have required Internet service providers to block infringing websites.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar doug porter January 17, 2012 at 1:04 pm

it should be noted that Harry Reid will bring the Senate version to a vote on January 24th. the big corporations are watching… the whole world is watching.

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avatar doug porter January 17, 2012 at 2:07 pm

They ain’t dead. Hiding under a rock, maybe…

Washington, D.C. – House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) today said that he expects the Committee to continue its markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act in February.
Chairman Smith: “To enact legislation that protects consumers, businesses and jobs from foreign thieves who steal America’s intellectual property, we will continue to bring together industry representatives and Members to find ways to combat online piracy.
“Due to the Republican and Democratic retreats taking place over the next two weeks, markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act is expected to resume in February.

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avatar Frank Gormlie January 17, 2012 at 4:59 pm

Gizmodo says: SOPA Isn’t Dead

You know that roach we thought we all stepped on and flushed this month? Nope, still crawling around: SOPA hearings will resume next month.

Straight from the Judiciary horse’s mouth:

Washington, D.C. – House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) today said that he expects the Committee to continue its markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act in February.

Chairman Smith: “To enact legislation that protects consumers, businesses and jobs from foreign thieves who steal America’s intellectual property, we will continue to bring together industry representatives and Members to find ways to combat online piracy.

“Due to the Republican and Democratic retreats taking place over the next two weeks, markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act is expected to resume in February.

“I am committed to continuing to work with my colleagues in the House and Senate to send a bipartisan bill to the White House that saves American jobs and protects intellectual property.”

We’ll have to see how SOPA’s backers maneuver around the White House’s opposition to the bill—unless it’s modified, it’ll get a big fat veto.

Looks like those blackouts tomorrow will mean something after all. [

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