Latest News: Chicago Factory Occupation Goes Into Third Day, plus more background …

by on December 7, 2008 · 1 comment

in Civil Disobedience, Civil Rights, Economy, Labor, Organizing

The worker occupation of the Republic Windows and Doors factory on Chicago’s Goose Island by members of UE (United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America) Local 1110 went into its third day on Sunday, and workers have vowed to continue the occupation until they are paid back pay and benefits, or until the plant is re-opened.

The occupation was declared on Friday, the day the company moved to shutter the plant with only three days notice — in violation of federal and state labor laws. Owners have also cut off employees’ insurance and failed to pay back pay. The takeover has sparked a groundswell of support across the nation, with rallies, e-mail campaigns, petition drives, fundraisers and plans for future actions. [ Updated news links ]

Company management blames the shut-down on Bank of America, which cut their credit line — after BoA received $25 billion in federal bailout money that the bank said they did not need. Since the bailout began, BoA — like big banks across the globe — has slashed credit lines to businesses, forcing a growing number of small and medium-sized companies to shut down. Workers plan to meet with company and bank representatives on Monday — and to picket BoA’s LaSalle St. offices on Tuesday if Republic’s line of credit is not restored.

The action at Republic Windows comes on the heels of a drive to kick out the company union, which had colluded with company owners and management for years. That effort succeeded after three years of struggle. Republic Windows’ worker occupation is one of the first actions of its kind in the United States since the Great Depression, when a wave of sit-in strikes and factory occupations marked one of the most militant phases in U.S. labor history.

Rally in support of the workers occuping Chicago factory

by Chris Geovanis/ Chicago Indymedia / December 6, 2008

Hundreds of people gathered Saturday afternoon at the Republic Windows factory on Chicago’s Goose Island to lend their solidarity to Republic workers, who occupied the plant on Friday. The workers have vowed to continue the occupation until they are paid back pay and benefits, or until the plant is re-opened — by the owners or by the workers themselves.

On Tuesday, the owners announced that because Bank of America has cut their credit line, the factory would be shuttered and all workers laid off on Friday — without federally and state-mandated notice, severance pay and benefits. The workers instead voted to take over the plant, and have vowed to occupy the factory floor until the company pays them the money they’re owed.

Bank of America received $25 billion in federal bailout money earlier this fall, despite pointing out at the time that they were not in financial need. Since the bailout began, BOA — like other big banks across the globe — has slashed essential credit lines to manufacturing and service businesses, forcing a growing number of small and medium-sized companies to shut down.

The action at Republic Windows comes on the heels of a workers’ campaign at the plant to kick out the company union, which had colluded with company owners and management for years. That effort succeeded after three years of struggle, and workers have vowed to take that fighting spirit of solidarity to the wall with the factory occupation, as well.

Republic Windows’ worker occupation is one of the first actions of its kind in the United States since the Great Depression, when a wave of worker seizures of factories and manufacturing operations marked one of the most militant phases in U.S. labor history.

More on Factory Occupation

by Lee Sustar / Community Labor News / December 6, 2008

WORKERS OCCUPYING the Republic Windows & Doors factory slated for closure are vowing to remain in the Chicago plant until they win the $1.5 million in severance and vacation pay owed them by management.

In a tactic rarely used in the U.S. since the labor struggles of the 1930s, the workers, members of United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE) Local 1110, refused to leave the plant on December 5, its last scheduled day of operation.

“We decided to do it because this is money that belongs to us,” said Maria Roman, who’s worked at the plant for eight years. “These are our rights.”

Word of the occupation spread quickly both among labor and immigrant rights activists–the overwhelming majority of the workers are Latinos. Seven local TV news stations showed up to do interviews and live reports, and a steady stream of activists arrived to bring donations of food and money and to plan solidarity actions.

Management claims that it can’t continue operations because its main creditor, Bank of America (BoA), refuses to make any more loans to the company. After workers picketed BoA headquarters December 3, bank officials agreed to sit down with Republic management and UE to discuss the matter at a December 5 meeting arranged by U.S. Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill), said UE organizer Leah Fried.

BoA had said that it couldn’t discuss the matter with the union directly without written approval from Republic’s management. But Republic representatives failed to show up at the meeting, and plant managers prepared to close the doors for good–violating the federal WARN Act that requires 60 days notice of a plant closure.

The workers decided this couldn’t go unchallenged. “The company and Bank of America are throwing the ball to one another, and we’re in the middle,” said Vicente Rangel, a shop steward and former vice president of Local 1110.

Many workers had suspected the company was planning to go out of business–and perhaps restart operations elsewhere. Several said managers had removed both production and office equipment in recent days.

Furthermore, while inventory records indicated there were plenty of parts in the plant, workers on the production line found shortages. And the order books, while certainly down from the peak years of the housing boom, didn’t square with management’s claims of a total collapse. “Where did all those windows go?” one worker asked.

Workers were especially outraged that Bank of America, which recently received a bailout in taxpayer money, won’t provide credit to Republic. “They get $25 billion from the government, and won’t loan a few million to this company so workers can keep their jobs?” said Ricardo Caceres, who has worked at the plant for six years.

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THE MEMBERS of Local 1110 have a history of struggle. In 2004, they decertified the Central States Joint Board–a union notorious for corruption and sweetheart contracts with management–and brought in UE, a far more democratic organization.

In May of this year, Local 1110 mobilized for a contract by organizing a “practice” picket, and 70 workers used their lunch break to confront the boss with a petition listing their demands. The workers were able to turn back company’s effort to win major concessions and won solid pay increases.Now, management is trying to get revenge by pocketing money that belongs to the workers.

UE officials and workers acknowledge that it will be difficult to stop the plant from closing. But they’re determined to get the money owed to them–and they believe that by fighting, they can set an example for other workers facing layoffs and plant closures as the recession deepens.

Negotiations are set for Monday, December 8. Whatever happens, however, the workers have already sent a message to employers that if they violate workers rights and the law, they can expect a fight.

“This is a message to the workers of America,” said Vicente Rangel, the shop steward. “If we stand together, we will prevail until justice is done, and we get what we’re due.”

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Members of Local 1110 need your support. Make checks payable to the UE Local 1110 Solidarity Fund, and mail to: 37 S. Ashland, Chicago, IL 60607. Messages of support can be sent to leahfried@gmail.com [2]. For more information, call UE at 312-829-8300.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

avatar Suggestions4Obama.com December 8, 2008 at 9:29 am

I was glad to hear Obama voice his support of these workers. I hope they get every bit of what they’re owed and I hope the owners of this company get properly disciplined or fined. When I first heard this story I could not understand that they thought they could even get away with this – but the fact is – they would have gotten away with it if these workers hadn’t stood up. Kudos to all of them.

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